40W Featured Artist - William Ferraioli

William Ferraioli only recently joined 40 West Arts District, but he’s been a fixture since his inception, showcasing work in our November Members Showcase, volunteering to hang works and staff the gallery, and exhibiting three pieces in our current exhibit, Attracted to Abstracts (on display now through the close of 2016).

When asked to describe his work William states, “I make mostly non-objective, non-representational works. That is, I do not attempt to represent the natural world of objects and phenomena with ‘painterly photographs’. My concerns are those of the picture making process. If it is visually interesting I am usually happy.”

In the first of a regular series, we ask William ten questions; some artsy, some zany, and some completely random. You can also see William’s full artist statement and additional images of his works below. And don’t forget to head over to 40 West Arts Gallery for our current exhibit, Attracted to Abstracts.


Is there one, or a few colors that you tend to gravitate toward in your abstract art, and why?
I use a gray, made from burnt umber and cobalt blue quite a bit. I like something that should be cold and stark to have a little warmth.

What do you do when you get creatively blocked?
I make most of my own frames and stretchers and also make furniture for our own use. If the painting stalls, I may work on a frame or some other woodworking project. Sometimes I'll do nothing. The danger here is that if I stop for too long I may never start up again.

What do you eat or drink, if anything, when you’re working?
I don't usually eat while working. Too many chances for crumbs in the paint.

Does your abstract art ever get misinterpreted? What’s the weirdest interpretation you’ve ever gotten?
I don't know if misinterpreted is the right word. If someone is happy with their interpretation, so be it. I don't expect anyone to know what's on my mind, when I often don't know. I did a work about the twin towers and someone thought it was a Christmas tree.

What’s something you’ve always wanted to do but never done?
I've always wanted to visit Italy.

1920’s or 1960’s, pick one and why?
1960's--Many of my life's milestones happened then. Went to college, first real job, first marriage, birth of my daughter, first art classes, Woodstock, and, of course, the Beatles.

What’s the best gift you’ve ever given someone?
One recent Christmas I gave my daughter a packet of about 100 drawings of her that I had made from her first day home from the hospital until about 12 years old.

What do you worry about and why?
Everything. It's a genetic trait.

What’s your best trait?
Patience.

If you could have dinner with anyone, living or dead, who would it be?
Leonardo daVinci. That is, if his cook knows how to make a vegetarian meal.


Full Artist Statement:
What does it mean? Yes, what does it mean. I am asked this question all the time. People are searching for meaning everywhere and in everything. I wish I knew the answer. I wish I could help them.
I make mostly non-objective, non-representational works. That is, I do not attempt to represent the natural world of objects and phenomena with "painterly photographs". My concerns are those of the picture making process. If it is visually interesting I am usually happy. I can't help or explain the aspects of my being that somehow creep into the final image. I read a statement somewhere by Steven Soderbergh, the film director, that pretty much sums up how I feel. He said " I'm always curious too hear how something was made - though I have no interest in why an artist did something, or what his work means. Like with Jackson Pollock: I'm always interested in what kind of paint and canvas he used, I just don't want to know what he meant. You're supposed to expand your mind to fit the art, you're not supposed to chop the art down to fit your mind".

Black-Holes-Acrylic-on-pic-board-17-x-18.jpg
Crazy-Chain-Acrylic-on-board-16-x-17.jpg
Jam-Oil-on-canvas-12-x-15.JPG
Little-Pink-Acrylic-on-canvas-14-x-14.jpg

Date Posted: Dec 1, 2016